New discovery shed light on a long puzzled vital mechanism of our body namely, how thousands of species of bacterias survive and thrive in our gut eco-system.

The gut is in an environment that is constantly changing , when we eat food and drink or even when we are under too much stress. Despite this constant change our gut is host to a variety of bacteria which thrive and survive in a stable eco-system.  As a matter of fact most mammals are colonized throughout there life with 100 trillion bacterial cells consisting of hundreds of microbial species. Researchers have long been puzzled by how these thousands of species do this, why certain bacteria's thrive over others and more importantly the contributions of this enormous and diverse ecosystem to human health.

 


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Posted in Medical News Biomedical By BrainChild Nutritionals

New perspective: Gut bacteria and Autism

July 29, 2013 3:57:06 PM PDT

 

 

New Study Finds Link between Autism and Heterogeneity in Gut Bacteria

An Arizona State University research team has found an association between autism and the diversity of bacteria in our guts. The new finding could pave the way for specific supplements that will reinforce the gut’s microflora (bacterial population).

 

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Posted in Medical News Biomedical General Health By BrainChild Nutritionals

Gut-brain Connection no longer "Crazy Talk": AAP

November 27, 2012 12:23:06 PM PST

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has just taken a giant leap toward recognizing the association between gastrointestinal problems and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD.)

The November 2012 issue of their journal, Pediatrics, has a 200-page supplement entitled Improving Health Care for Children and Youth With Autism and Other Neurodevelopmental Disorders.  As I perused the various articles to see what the AAP was up to, one particular gem caught my eye: Gastrointestinal (GI) Conditions in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Developing a Research Agenda...

After a mere three sentences, my jaw dropped.

“Many individuals with ASDs have symptoms of associated medical conditions, including seizures, sleep problems, metabolic conditions, and gastrointestinal disorders (the italics are mine), which have significant health, developmental, social, and educational impacts.” A few lines later I found there is a “lack of recognition by clinicians that certain behavioral manifestations in children with ASDs are indicators of GI problems (eg, pain, discomfort, or nausea).”

My first thought was that someone from ARI or MAPS had snuck into the AAP and switched a few words in the article before it went to press, and no one had noticed. But as I read the entire piece, I was shocked to see other crazy ideas such as...

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Posted in Medical News By Terri Mykland