Diet changes could dramatically help manage behavior of kids with ADHD, study says

Eleven percent of children from ages 4 to 17 have been diagnosed with ADHD, and the majority of them take medicine to control the symptoms, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Now, a round of new, peer-reviewed studies have revealed that simple changes in diet can dramatically help manage it.

It can also help in behavior of children without ADHD.

 

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Posted in Sensitive Living General Health By NEWS

Natural Ways to Support children with ADHD

June 28, 2013 10:06:06 AM PDT

 

Over the past few years parents, along with their physicians, have been seeking a more natural health care alternative for children with ADHD. Around 6.4 million children, ranging from the ages of 4 -17 years of age, at some point in their lives been diagnosed by medical professionals, as having Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

In many of these cases these children were given psychotropic drugs as means of lessening the symptoms of the ailment.

 

The issue here is that, while the medications may have been successful in rectifying short-term issues, there were consequences and risks involved in using these drugs for longer periods. It’s no surprise that parents all over the world are looking for more natural alternatives in coping with ADHD symptoms.


This article describes the other natural possibilities that are easily available to parents seeking Natural approaches to there children with ADHD.


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Posted in Medical News Biomedical Sensitive Living By BrainChild Nutritionals

3/31/13 New York Times Nearly one in five high school age boys in the United States and 11 percent of school-age children over all have received a medical diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to new data from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. These rates reflect a marked rise over the last decade and could fuel growing concern among many doctors that the A.D.H.D. diagnosis and its medication are overused in American children LINK: Rate of ADHD Diagnosis in Children The figures showed that an estimated 6.4 million children ages 4 through 17 had received an A.D.H.D. diagnosis at some point in their lives, a 16 percent increase since 2007 and a 41 percent rise in the past decade. About two-thirds of those with a current diagnosis receive prescriptions for stimulants like Ritalin or Adderall, which can drastically improve the lives of those with A.D.H.D. but can also lead to addiction, anxiety and occasionally psychosis “Those are astronomical numbers. I’m floored,” said Dr. William Graf, a pediatric neurologist in New Haven and a professor at the Yale School of Medicine. He added, “Mild symptoms are being diagnosed so readily, which goes well beyond the disorder and beyond the zone of ambiguity to pure enhancement of children who are otherwise healthy.” And even more teenagers are likely to be prescribed medication in the near future because the American Psychiatric Association plans to change the definition of A.D.H.D. to allow more people to receive the diagnosis and treatment. A.D.H.D. is described by most experts as resulting from abnormal chemical levels in the brain that impair a person’s impulse control and attention skills.

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Posted in Medical News By Terri Mykland

Exercise may help ADHD

March 22, 2013 2:20:19 PM PDT

Exercise may lead to better School Performance for Kids with ADHD

Oct 16, 2012 - A few minutes of exercise can help children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder perform better academically, according to a new study led by a Michigan State University researcher. The study, published in the current issue of the Journal of Pediatrics, shows for the first time that kids with ADHD can better drown out distractions and focus on a task after a single bout of exercise. Scientists say such "inhibitory control" is the main challenge faced by people with the disorder. "This provides some very early evidence that exercise might be a tool in our nonpharmaceutical treatment of ADHD," said Matthew Pontifex, MSU assistant professor of kinesiology, who led the study. "Maybe our first course of action that we would recommend to developmental psychologists would be to increase children's physical activity." While drugs have proven largely effective in treating many of the 2.5 million school-aged American children with ADHD, a growing number of parents and physicians worry about the side effects and costs of medication.

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Posted in Biomedical By Terri Mykland

The psychiatric illnesses seem very different -- schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism, major depression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Yet they share several genetic glitches that can nudge the brain along a path to mental illness, researchers report. Which disease, if any, develops is thought to depend on other genetic or environmental factors. Their study, published online Wednesday in the Lancet, was based on an examination of genetic data from more than 60,000 people world-wide. Its authors say it is the largest genetic study yet of psychiatric disorders. The findings strengthen an emerging view of mental illness that aims to make diagnoses based on the genetic aberrations underlying diseases instead of on the disease symptoms.

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Posted in Medical News By Terri Mykland